World Ocean Day – Plastic Pollution – Reuse, Reduce, Recycle


Sea-Turtle sunny sleevez

June 8th is World Oceans Day, the UN-designated day for the global community to celebrate and take action for our shared ocean.

One of the greatest threats to the ocean is also one of the most insidious because chances are it’s so mundane you don’t even notice it.

Look around you right now: how much plastic do you see?

The ocean is downstream from all of us so no matter where we live, so we can all help address the issue of plastic pollution in the ocean. Each year a huge amount of plastic eventually makes it into coastal waters and harms ocean life. Many animals such as seabirds, sea turtles, dolphins, and whales die every year from plastic entanglement or starvation because they fill up their stomachs on plastic they mistake for food.

Take action for World Oceans Day and prevent plastic from harming ocean wildlife!

Reduce plastic use . Help stop plastic pollution at its source! As consumers, we each have the power to reduce demand. And if you encourage family and friends to do the same, the more the more good we can do to keep the ocean clean and safe. Here are a few disposable plastic products everyone can reduce in our daily lives:

Plastic water bottles. Invest in a reusable water bottle, and filter water if necessary. Help the ocean and save money; it’s a win-win for you and the blue. On average, Americans now use 4 plastic water bottles a day—the highest ever recorded! Let’s turn the tide against wasteful plastic consumption.

Plastic bags. People use nearly 1 trillion plastic bags each year, and unfortunately, many of those end up ingested by sea turtles that mistake plastic for jellyfish. Remember to bring a reusable bag for food (including vegetables) and other shopping and save a life!

Straws, cups to-go, food containers, and utensils. Bring your own reusable products like mugs when you get coffee and take a pass on the plastic utensils when you get take-out food. And if you must have a straw, there are a number of affordable options!

Be aware of packaging. Pay attention to how much incidental plastic that comes with what you buy—your candy, headphones, pens, etc., all come in plastic packaging. Strive to cut down on your daily plastic consumption and reward corporations that package responsibly!

Act for World Oceans Day! Hold a ‘Switch for the Sea’ contest! Ask friends and family to switch one of their disposable plastic habits for a sustainable, ocean-friendly one: such as bringing reusable food containers from home when eating out for your ‘doggie bag.’ Organize an aquatic clean-up! Head out to your nearest and dearest body of water with some friends and pick up all the trash you find. You’ll be surprised at how much of it is plastic.

Ban the bag in your town. Many communities around the world are banning plastic bags from being used at their stores. Learn how to start a campaign to stop plastic bags use in your town!

There are hundreds of events being held all over the world, find one near you and celebrate with a purpose thisWorld Oceans Day! You can also go the extra mile and organize an event yourself using ideas and free materials provided at WorldOceansDay.org!

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About sunnysleevez

I'm a freckly red head, originally from London now living in LA with 2 pale children. Frankly with our coloring we have no business being such an outdoorsy family and living in southern California. I grew up in a time when factor 8 sun milk was considered the best protection available to combat the hot rays of a holiday in southern Spain, that lead to 3rd degree burns and the rest of the vacation spent in the shade of our apartment. As a family we love to be outside, going to the beach, camping, swimming & hiking. We can't completely avoid the sun (nor should we) but taking sensible measures to avoid unnecessary UV damage is a priority. How do we do that? By staying in the shade in the middle of the day, wearing sun protective clothing (that's why I created Sunny Sleevez), a broad brimmed hat, UV rated sunglasses, using chemical-free broad spectrum sun screen on exposed areas & eating a healthy diet with as few chemicals as possible & lots of antioxidants.
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8 Responses to World Ocean Day – Plastic Pollution – Reuse, Reduce, Recycle

  1. lenrosen4 says:

    Our city council here in Toronto just outlawed plastic bags. The pushback has been unbelievable. People are acting like their rights are being violated….my freedom to pollute!!! I’ve been writing about the ocean in blogs on http://www.21stcentech.com and degraded plastic can be found at depths of 30 meters and below in ocean water. What are we thinking?

  2. rommel says:

    Thanks for the heads up.

  3. Sarah Shaw says:

    Thanks for this info Dash!

  4. comicsagogo says:

    Thanks for the reminder that everything is connected.

  5. alangent says:

    Here in the UK we are becoming more aware of packaging and people quite often ‘depackage’ their goods and then the stuff back to the supermarket as a protest – do we really need our cucumbers in shrink wrap? I don’t for one. Nice post thanks.

  6. Pra'zy says:

    Nice article..and I guess we can celebrate this everyday…zn’t it?

  7. Paul J. Stam says:

    First of all I want to thank you so much for following my blog, “Paper, Mud and Me.” Secondly I want to thank you for this well written and informative article. Living in Hawaii we are very away of the debris that washes up on our beaches from around the world, not to mention the local disregard for keeping things “picked up.”

  8. Very nice an informative article! Thanks for sharing.

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